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Can You Afford To Buy Your First Home?

For the longest time, buying a home was one of those things that was just sort of treated as an expected part of life. It was up there with a career, a marriage, and all of the other things that make up the stereotypical path of someone’s life. Of course, as time has gone on these things have become less and less necessary to live a happy life but when it comes to buying a home, something else has happened. There are just as many people who would love to buy a home as before, but it’s become more and more difficult. The reality is that with house prices constantly going up and wages stagnating, many people end up feeling as though the idea of actually being able to buy a home is little more than a fantasy. But is that actually the case? Of course not! The truth is that it’s still entirely possible to buy a house, even if it’s not as easy as it once was. You’ve just got to be prepared to put in the effort to understand the process, and make sure that your finances are in the right position to do it. With that in mind, here are just a few things to consider when trying to figure out if you can afford to buy your first home.

The mortgage

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The most obvious thing that comes to mind when people are thinking about buying their first home is the process of getting a mortgage. After all, unless you happen to be extremely lucky, you’re very likely not going to be in a position to buy a home outright. (If you are then what are you doing reading this?!) The issue for a lot of people is that the process of getting a mortgage can be rather scary and complex. After all, you often end up having to wade through stacks of paper with all kinds of confusing clauses and small print. Not only that but your success in actually applying for a mortgage can often depend on a number of factors. Using something like a home loan eligibility calculator is a great first step in checking to see what kind of mortgage you may be able to take out. That way, you can figure out any potential changes that you might need to be able to buy a home and what it could end up costing you in the long term.

The deposit

One of the biggest barriers to a lot of people’s ability to buying a home is very likely to be the deposit. For many people over the years, they’ve been able to buy a home with incredibly small deposits that made buying a home and getting a mortgage a whole lot more accessible. This is something that has become even more pronounced in the era of COVID-19. Where previous generations might have been able to get a home with a 1% or 2% deposit, there are many lenders who won’t accept less than a 10% deposit in the current era. When you combine that with the rising house prices then it’s clear that being able to afford a deposit is a much bigger challenge than before. However, just because something’s a challenge doesn’t mean that it’s impossible. The key is to start putting money aside as soon as possible. If buying a home is something that you’re really committed to then every spare bit of money that you have should be put away. Find new ways to budget to allow you to save more and every bit of extra cash that comes in should go in the pile. It isn’t necessarily going to be a fast process, but it’s the only way to really afford a deposit in the current era.

The fees

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It often comes as something of a nasty surprise to a lot of people when they realise just how many fees are involved in the process of buying a home. If you’re not aware of the fees that come with buying your first home then you could end up in some serious trouble. You have to consider mortgage fees, a valuation fee, a survey fee, a potential broker fee, your solicitors fee, and a whole lot more. Now, most of the time these are things that you will be taken through at the start of the process but you need to be aware of these kinds of fees well in advance so that you don’t go into the process assuming that you can afford a home when you simply can’t.

Your credit rating

As strange as it might sound, it’s not just a matter of having the money and actually being able to afford a home, you also need to be able to demonstrate that you can afford the payments in the long term. The way that this is calculated is through your credit rating. If you have a poor credit rating then it won’t matter whether you have the money for a deposit or not. Things like paying off your credit cards on time and making any loan payments in full is the best way to ensure that your credit rating is always in the best possible shape.

The truth is, while it is absolutely possible to afford to buy your first home, it would be a mistake to assume that it’s something that’s going to be easy to do. A home is likely to be the most expensive purchase you ever make and that’s not something that you should take lightly. If you want to buy a home then you’ve got to be willing to think ahead. It’s the kind of thing that you need to plan for and make changes in your life if you want to be able to afford it. The mistake that a lot of people make is that they assume that they can’t buy a home when what they actually mean is that they can’t buy a home “right now.” By planning ahead, managing your finances, and working towards a goal, you’re going to be in a far better position to buy your first home regardless of your personal circumstances.

10 Home Loan Tips to Help You Survive Your First Purchase

In the life of an adult, there are a few times that are commonly stressful. One is getting married, another is having a child, and buying a home is another.

While it might be exhilarating to search for homes and wander through open houses, the actual process of buying a house is enough to force someone to live in an apartment forever. From the waiting to the paperwork, there is nothing else quite like buying a home. Fortunately, there are a few home loan tips from the pros that can help you survive the stress, struggle, and moments of impatience.

10 Home Loan Tips to Help You Survive Your First Purchase - home loan image

1. Understand What You Can Afford

Having the biggest house on the block might be your dream, but being “house poor” is no fun. When you shop for your home, find something you can afford so you can enjoy living in your home. Learn what you can afford before you even begin to look so you do not fall in love with a house that you cannot afford.

2. Get Pre-Approved

Once you know what you can afford, it is wise to talk to a mortgage expert and get pre-approved for a home loan. This will give you credibility with sellers, especially if you want to see homes by appointment. Getting pre-approved for a mortgage is not the same process as getting a mortgage, it simply means that you have the income and credit rating that qualifies you for a mortgage of a pre-approved amount.

This home loan tip means that if you get into a bidding war with another buyer, having a pre-approval letter could give you an advantage.

3. Research Neighborhoods

If you find a home that seems like the price is just too good to be true, there is usually a reason – the neighborhood. It is amazing to consider that a similar home could range in value dramatically because of the neighborhood.

Prior to choosing a home, responsible home buyers will research neighborhoods, especially the schools, the public transportation options, the noise, and the nearby shops and other amenities. Check out how neighbors interact with each other. Look at how neighbors take care of their yards and where they park their cars. Some neighborhoods have associated fees, which can substantially add to monthly payments.

4. Prepare For The Added Costs

When you buy a home, there are more expenses than the down payment and the monthly payment. There are good-faith deposits, closing costs, inspection fees, homeowners insurance, and moving expenses. Make sure that you can afford all of them.

5. Decide What You Need Now

Many first-time home buyers will buy a house for the future. They will look for homes with several bedrooms, large yards, and plenty of places for children to play – even if they do not have any children.

Then, they have to take care of all of that space and make those massive mortgage payments. This leaves little time to consider having children because home expenses are so high.

There are also home buyers who will buy a very small home because there are just two people in the family at the time. But, then children come along and there simply isn’t time to find a bigger home and move because it is time-consuming and expensive to raise children.

Somehow, you will decide what suits your needs and your budget now and will keep you comfortable if your situation changes.

6. Get Involved In The Inspection Process

This can be overwhelming for the buyer and seller. The inspection is usually limited, so it can be helpful to ask for additional inspections. You will have to decide if the home is going to be safe to live in and if you can live in it without worrying about constantly having to repair it.

It is worth the extra money to pay for inspections for mold, insects, and radon. It is also worth it to pay for the inspector to evaluate the roof and crawl spaces. You should do everything in your power to attend all of the inspections. If you have a concern, ask the inspector to look at it the concern a second or third time.

7. Work With Professionals

It might be enticing to buy a home for a low cost or for free through your brother’s uncle’s best friend who sold houses in 1979 but still has his real estate license, but it certainly will not help you in the long run.

It might seem like a waste of money to pay a realtor, but good ones can actually make the process less stressful. Do not skimp here, or you will pay for it in other ways.

8. Save For A Down Payment And For A Problem

When you are saving for your down payment, you should also save for the first problem. Most expensive problems happen when you least expect it. The furnace might quit in the middle of a snowstorm. Your water heater will die when you are taking a shower on the coldest morning of the year. Your garage door opener breaks when you are late for work.

When you own a home, you have to pay to fix the problems that arise. And, they will arise. You just don’t know when. So, having money set aside to fix those problems makes them get fixed faster.

9. Learn How Mortgages Work

Mortgages are complicated. They are more than down payments and monthly payments. There are special home loans for first-time buyers. There are home loan programs for veterans and for people in special industries, like medicine. You can find out more from mortgage websites about the specific products that meet your needs.

Mortgages also come with options. There are ways to reduce down payments, but other costs increase. You can choose to get a 30-year mortgage or a 15-year mortgage. You can choose to have an adjustable interest rate or one that remains steady throughout the term of the loan. The options are plentiful and can be customized to meet your financial needs.

10. Learn Patience

The last of our home loan tips is to remember that the process of buying a home requires patience. When people hurry through it, problems usually happen. Others have been through the process and here is a handy stress free guide to moving. Finally, learn to work methodically and patiently through the process, so you are sure that everything will work out properly and in your best interest.

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Home Loans: Your Options for Purchasing a Property

The vast majority of homebuyers in the UK will require some type of home loan to fund their property purchase. Yet many aren’t aware of how many loan options are available to them. Buyers don’t have to just rely on a mortgage from a high street lender if they wish to buy a home. There are a number of different loan types and government back schemes that can augment or completely replace the need for a mortgage. This guide will explore all of the different options available to you so that you’re in the best position possible when it comes to finding finance.

Home Loans: Your Options for Purchasing a Property - sold sign image

A private mortgage

For many, a mortgage will be the only loan they use to buy a home. Individuals can rarely pay for a house in cash, so banks and high street lenders will typically loan up to 95% of the cost of the home. In return, the mortgage provider will charge interest on the loan, which the homeowner must pay every month. Failure to keep up with payments will result in losing the home. Mortgages usually last 25 years, but they can be shortened to any length of time. Mortgages are the most common form of home loan, but they aren’t suitable for everyone. Banks have become increasingly cautious since the recession and it is much harder for people with small deposits, low incomes or bad credit histories to secure a mortgage.

Help to buy equity loan

First-time buyers have been hit particularly hard by high property prices, which have made it almost impossible for many young people to get on the property ladder. In response, the Government launched the Help to Buy Equity Loan scheme to help first timers get a foot on the ladder. With a 5% deposit, first-time buyers can secure a 20% loan from the Government on the cost of a newly built home meaning they will only need a mortgage of 75% to complete the purchase. This will result in much more affordable repayments. The Government’s loan is interest free for five years and then charged at 1.75%, rising annually by any increase in the Retail Price Index plus 1%. To qualify you must be a first-time buyer, use the property as your permanent residence and be buying a home that costs under £600,000.

Shared ownership

Another Government-backed initiative is the Shared Ownership scheme. Rather than buy the entire property outright, this allows buyers to buy a share of the property and then pay rent on the remainder. As a result, you pay the mortgage payments you can afford to start off with, and then buy the remainder of the property over time as your finances allow. There are strict criteria that you must meet to become eligible for this scheme, however.

  • Your household income must be less than £80,000 (or £90,000 if you live in London)
  • You can’t own any other property
  • You can’t have outstanding credit issues

Only specific properties are available to buy under this scheme, too. They will typically be new builds and will be purchased from a Housing Association.

Right to buy

A final Government-backed initiative to help people get on the property ladder is the Right to Buy scheme. If you are council tenant who has been living at your property for at least five years, you could be eligible to purchase the property at a discount. Discounts can be as large as £104,900 in London and £78,600 outside of the capital. Not everyone is eligible, however, and you will need to check the Government website to confirm your eligibility.

Bridging loans

The problem with mortgages is that they can take up to six months to get approved. For many buyers, this delay can mean missing out on the property of their dreams. In cases where time is of the essence, a bridging mortgage specialist like Top 10 Finance Bridging Loans can help you find finance that’s an excellent alternative to traditional mortgages. A bridging loan is a short-term loan that aims to “bridge the gap” until more secure funding is obtained whereupon the loan is repaid in full with interest. A common scenario where a bridging loan is useful is where a family want to purchase a new home before their current property has sold. Getting a mortgage will take too long but a bridging loan can be approved in a fraction of the time. The bridging loan is used to buy the new home and is repaid when the previous family home has been sold. Bridging loans aren’t for everyone so it will be important to speak to a bridging mortgage specialist to decide if this is the right solution for you.

So there you have it, there are all of the types of funding available to you. But don’t forget to speak to a specialist before you apply for a home loan or government scheme. http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

Living In A Big City – Handy Financial Tips

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Living in a big city is not always easy. Sometimes the added pressures of gentrification, or general upmarket surroundings can take a pretty penny out of your wallet. If you’re struggling to cope with the added pressures to your wallet, we’re here to help you develop a much more competent attitude towards them, and potentially save yourself hundreds a month.

Even if you don’t find yourself in financial difficulty, these methods can help you become even more affluent. If you’ve recently failed to acquire the job or promotion you wanted, or have simply identified that you waste money recklessly, these tips can also help you offset, balance and grow your income more competently.

Consider Your Present & Future Home Living

Do you truly need to live where you do? While living in a central apartment might look beautiful and gift you a gorgeous vista, it might be surplus to your requirements. If you live alone, this might be doubly true. In big cities, pockets of property upkeep are found. Cutting your rent and living in a much more affordable place might not necessarily mean you have to cut down on a beautiful home. It might just mean convenience of travel is slightly less, adding ten minutes to your commute everyday.

For hundreds of dollars less a month, we’d say that’s worth it. Of course, you are entitled to live wherever you can legally occupy and afford. If you’re hoping to cut your city living costs down though, this can be the best place to start. Especially when consider gentrification often leads to a stronger buying hand when selling your property, specifically when using competent mortgage brokers to identify your next living space.

Transport

Do you really need a car? Many people in mid cities own cars for the status of it, even though transport solutions abound. Using Uber or Lyft for your general daily requirements can be much cheaper than a car, and give you much less of a yearly premium. City insurance can be very high, especially when considering your parking insurance.

More and more cities are asking for parking costs in built up areas, meaning that your car constantly drains your funding, even when not using its fuel. If you’re not particularly affluent, but live within a reasonable distance to your job, then selling your car could prove a decent injection of funding while lessening the monthly and yearly payment loads that trouble you.

The Best Things In Life Are Free

Of course, just because you live in a city doesn’t mean everything near you has a price tag. If you’re looking for entertainment, living in a place such as this is ripe with low-cost or free offerings. From street performers to public theatre shows to buskers, simply walking around your local environment can gift you a feeling of pure interest and entertainment. Just look around and search online, we can be sure that many classes, volunteering opportunities, promotional activities and more can be found to help you spend a weekend without having to worry about the cost. Sometimes, walking around your city and marvelling in the architectural complexity can be worthwhile in itself. http://credit-n.ru/zaymi-online-blog-single.html

Teachable Moments: Moving House

As an adult, you’re probably well aware of all the hassle that moving house tends to entail. You know you’re going to spend months viewing properties, scanning over contracts, and juggling buying a new house with trying to sell your old one. It’s likely a situation you’ve been through at least once before, so you know what it’s going to involve.

Your kids, however? They probably have no idea. By the time they’re of an age to understand what’s happening, their first move is going to be an alarming time. They can only remember ever living in one particular place. What happens to move them to another house is a somewhat mystical process, most of which goes over their heads.

This isn’t necessarily the best choice. If your children are of an age to understand what’s happening, then it’s worth seeing moving as a teachable moment. Rather than the process being something your kids have to go along with, but don’t get much information on, it can be a time of learning. There’s so much you can teach them during this time, but perhaps the most useful things to extrapolate are…

#1 – The Basics Of Home Ownership

Teaching your children about the basics of home ownership is a necessary part of your job as a parent, anyway – but what better time to do it than in the midst of a move?

Explain how ownership works. If they’re of an age to understand the math involved, then you can also teach them what a mortgage is. Obviously, you don’t need to delve into hugely complicated legal and economic detail – but a basic overview should suffice.

#2 – The Process Of Moving House

There’s no need to hide what happens to facilitate a house move. The sooner your children are exposed to the way the housing market works, the more time they will have to understand it before it becomes relevant to them. Focus on the basics:

  • How to find homes for sale. While going to real estate agent’s shop windows is the established method, the truth is that your children will probably primarily search for their own properties in future via the online property market, so you’re going to need to cover this.
  • How you go about selling your house and how you choose a price for it.
  • The basics of the legal process of exchanging contracts.
  • How the escrow process works – obviously, only if this is applicable to the move you’re doing.

Most children should be able to grasp at least the basics of the above; you can add or subtract where necessary depending on your child’s age specifically.

#3 – Stress Management

It’s not just financial teachable moments during the house moving process, either. You can also teach about how to handle stress. We all know how tough moving house can be, so showing your children that you’re on top of all the stress – and managing to keep smiling – can be a great practical lesson. Making it a lesson will also force you to cope with the stress better, so both parent and kids will benefit!

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