Important Steps In Getting Your Loan Approved

Getting approved for a loan certainly isn’t the easiest process in the world. With Brexit pushing the future of the nation’s economy into uncertainty, lenders are less strict than they were during the recession of the noughties, but more strict than they have been in the past. Bottom line: it’s still very important to present a great package if you want your loan to be approved. Here are some important steps to getting your loan approved…

Review your Personal Preferences

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Before you head straight to your bank and start asking questions, spend some time researching the market, and seeing what your alternatives are. This is an essential step to ensuring you can get your hands on some of the best offers on the market. This means thinking about the type of loan you’re looking for, the terms that you can reasonably afford, and how you’re going to pay off the loan in the shortest period of time possible. When you’re looking for a specific type of loan, such as a personal loan, auto loan, or a mortgage, scouring the market and avoiding impulsively jumping at any of the offers that arrive in your email inbox, is absolutely essential to coming out on top.

Know your Limits

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When you’re pursuing a loan, it’s important to be aware of your current credit score and your history. All good lenders will tell you the bracket of credit scores required for approval for a certain loan. You can prepare in advance by requesting a copy of your credit and history a few weeks prior to your actual application. Start reviewing your history for accuracy, and make sure you have enough time for correcting any kind of errors in your history. These days, lenders put a lot of emphasis on how you’ve used credit in the past. If there are any mistakes left in your report, you may wind up with a much lower score, which can obviously hurt your chances of being approved. Always consider your personal finances when you’re planning to pursue a loan, and target deals based on your limits, and realistic ability to make repayments which you can comfortably afford.

Manage your Expectations

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We’ve said it once and we’ll say it again: rushing through the process of applying for a loan is never a good idea. Loan officers have very strict protocol to follow when they’re approving loans and getting the money to applicants. Through the entire process, you should be discussing the sequence of your events so that you’ll know what to expect moving forward. While some loans can be pre-approved right out of the gate, you may not know all the specifics until a number of weeks have passed. Ask the experts when it comes to following up. Your overarching goal should be securing a loan that you definitely have the means to repay. Getting turned down for loans can be frustrating, but it’s important to understand your situation thoroughly and manage your expectations, and not to ruin your credit by applying for loan after loan.

Uncovering The Links Between Poor Health & Debt

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The vast majority of people out there have some form of debt. It might be a home loan, for example, a credit card, or maybe just a monthly prescription you pay for services received. But, whereas debt seems to be entirely normal these days, bad debts are a huge issue – not just to people’s finances, but also to their health and wellbeing. And if you are looking for reasons to teach your kids about the importance of sound financial knowledge, the fact that bad debts will harm them in the future should be all you need to start educating them right now. Let’s take a look at some of the links between bad debts and poor health – and see how we can all make sure our children never suffer from either.

High blood pressure levels

Having bad debts means that your lenders will, to all intents and purposes, be after you. Phone calls, letters, emails – your creditors will be trying their damnedest to get their money back by almost any means necessary. Unsurprisingly, this can lead to stressful health issues such as high blood pressure. A study in Norway found that adults with high debt-to-asset ratios suffered from higher blood pressure than others, and also suffered from poor health in many other areas. And it’s also important to note that those adults studied were in their prime, too; between the ages of 24-32. It’s important to bear this in mind for your children, as it could only be a decade or so before bad debts could start impacting their lives – and blood pressure. Don’t’ forget, developing a higher blood pressure means people will be more at risk of heart attack or stroke – it’s that serious.

Lowers immunity

Chronic stress doesn’t just affect your blood pressure – most researchers and scientists understand that stress can also suppress your immune system. So, the more down the dangerous debt spiral you go, the more your blood pressure rises, and more at risk your body will be to general illnesses. Being in debt also has a tendency to keep you awake at night with worry so you won’t be sleeping well. And, as every doctor will tell you, sleep is vital for giving your body a chance to recover and recuperate, as well as fighting off any infections.

Feelings of anxiety

It’s not much of a surprise to hear that the more debt you are in, the more anxious you will become. Anxiety is a symptom of stress, and owing a lot of money is obviously an incredibly stressful experience. Feelings of anxiety can seep into all kinds of different areas in your life. You might struggle to be sociable, for example, and withdraw from your friends and family networks. It can impact on your productivity at work, too – meaning you are more likely to have to take time off or maybe even lose your job. And anxiety is also an indicator of high blood pressure, which, as we mentioned above, can lead to heart problems and stroke.

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Depression

When you owe a lot of money and can’t afford to pay it back, you tend to feel helpless. And the impact of those feelings can be dramatic on your psychological makeup. Unhappiness can quickly lead to depression, and the feeling for many people in debt is that they are underwater and incapable of helping themselves, which exacerbates those depressive feelings even further. And while many people discount depression as not a serious issue, the simple fact is that it has a terrible impact on people and those that love them. Families can break up, people can lose their jobs and find themselves unable to work, which increases the debt spiral further. As a parent, one of the worst things you can face is your beloved child developing depression, and feeling like there is nothing you can do to help them.

Doctor’s visits

When you owe a lot of money, some things in life that you deem unnecessary will often take a hit. That might mean paying fewer visits to your doctor, even when you are sick. There is a direct link between those who have high levels of credit card and medical debt and those who are less likely to visit their doctor for regular checkups. And the simple truth is that when you tie in the many health problems debt can cause and fail to see a doctor, there is more chance of serious issues arising.

Severe injuries

You can be leading a perfectly sensible lifestyle one minute. But a serious injury or accident can change everything in a single moment. Not only will you have to consider quitting your job, but you might also have to find tens of thousands – possibly hundreds – to pay for medical care. Health insurance can help, of course, as can finding a personal injury lawyer to claim for compensation. But there are no guarantees that your insurance company will pay out, or that you will win your case. The reality for many people who suffer serious injuries is that their finances will take a hit, their lifestyle opportunities will dramatically reduce, while their debt levels will increase. You can’t teach your child to avoid accidents, of course. But you can teach them how to prepare for the worst.

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Aches and pains

Nasty letters from debt collectors and angry lenders can even lead to you developing physical symptoms such as headaches, pains, and muscular tensions. In fact, researchers have found almost one in every two of those who were in bad debt also reported frequent migraines, headaches, and digestive problems. So, if you want your child to grow up physically healthy, it’s worth teaching them the benefits of financial security.

Eating habits

When you are in the midst of a severe debt problem, it’s not unusual to stop being mindful of what you are eating. Stress levels can keep your hunger at bay, and when you eventually crash, you will often reach out for quick fixes such as sugary snacks and fast food. And make no mistake about it, when you are eating too much garbage, it is going to have a grave impact on your body’s ability to fight other issues. Your stress levels will rise, too, as you aren’t getting enough nutrients, and feelings of depression are also likely to follow because you end up not taking care of yourself. Again, it’s being in debt that can lock you into a vicious cycle of ailments that can lead to others – and increases the damage they cause.

Exercise

As surprising as it might be to hear, research suggests that more than sixty percent of people with bad debts don’t take enough exercise every week. While the reasons for the link are not clear, it is an alarming statistic, given that exercise is part of the key to a healthy and long-lasting life. Exercise releases endorphins in the brain, which can protect you against depression and stress, both of which can arise due to having bad debts. For parents with growing children, it’s important to realise the positive impacts of exercise on their futures. And it’s also vital to understand that if they do have bad debts, it might even protect them against some of the many health issues that being in debt can cause.

As you can see, there is a broad range of links between poor health and bad debts. The pressures and strains of being in debt can take a toll on anyone’ s mind and body – and it’s something you need to prepare your children for in the future.

Ways to Save for a Mortgage Deposit

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Buying your first home is a big step, and if you want to avoid falling into the trap of forever renting, there are several things you can do which will speed up the saving process. Here is a quick guide to get out of rented accommodation and to saving for a house deposit.

Whether you are looking to buy a luxury Meriton apartment or a simple two-storey home, it is likely that you won’t be able to save much money if you are renting. If you feel that you can sacrifice your personal space so that you can save, there are a few options for you.

One option is to move back in with your parents for a little while. However, only do this if you get on well with your parents and live close to them. If moving in with them will add another hour or so to your work commute, it’s hardly worth it more the extra travel expenses. Talk to them about how much you will stay, what you will contribute towards rent and how you will help out around the house.

It is also possible to sub-let your spare room and get a lodger. This will help subsidize the cost of your home and allow you to gain control of your finances and save for a deposit. Before you start searching for a new flatmate to move in, you will need to talk to your current landlord and see if they are happy with what you are planning. They may agree to either of the following options:

  • Advertise commercially for a new housemate and reduce your rent
  • Allow you to advertise and sub-let the spare room in your rented accommodation

Either way, you will be saving money on your rent and able to put more away. Be strong, and remember that this extra cash isn’t supposed to be for extra fun and set up a direct debit to go straight into your savings.

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If neither of the above are options for you, it’s probably time for you to look for a cheaper place to live. Ask around and see if any of your friends have a spare room that they are willing to rent out for a few months – remember to talk to them about rent, bills and what you will do around the house before agreeing to anything. If you have no friends with a spare room, then there are loads of websites available which advertise rooms in shared houses, such as:

A house share will be much cheaper than renting a house or apartment all by yourself, as you will be splitting the cost of the house between several people. This should enable you the wiggle room to save more money and, eventually, put a deposit down for your own home!

It can be difficult moving into someone else’s space and living with them, especially if they are family or close friends and you are used to living alone. Remember that they are probably feeling the tension too, so do your best to help around the house and not make a mess!

Is It Affordable To Move Abroad?

At some point in our lives, we will move home. It might be that we move out of our parents home, sometimes the childhood home, into a new place of our own. It might be that our family grows large and we need to move from a smaller property into a larger one. There are almost no end to the reasons that people choose to move homes. Whether it be for financial gain or a better standard of living, people do move homes for plenty of reasons. These could be good reasons, or they could be bad reasons – but there are plenty for moving!

One of the reasons that people choose to move home is to experience new horizons. Now this could be a move from a new city from a smaller one, or a move from a big city to a smaller town! It could also mean moving abroad. Wait. Can you actually move abroad? Yes! Of course, you can. Is it affordable? Well – that is a separate question entirely. It depends on how smart you are in regards to the moving situation. Handling things poorly during a move abroad can stump up the cost – and if you don’t understand the language or laws – then your move could be disastrous.
Moving abroad means wonders for the sense of adventure that we all have, but that doesn’t mean we should rush into things. Time is valuable, but if you save time and cut corners planning the move abroad, it could impact more than just your bank balance. If you can establish a half-year buffer between now and your move, you should do so. Rushing into deals and arrangements can have a huge impact. What’s more, you can find better financial deals on homes, rentals, flights and other things by making arrangements well in advance of your move.

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Home prices will vary region from region, and laws will too. Purchasing a house and agreeing to a mortgage could be disastrous. Try and rent for a few months first and see if the move agrees with you. If it does, work out how home-buying works in your new country of residence and buy your home! Make sure it is affordable though. If you are simply living abroad on a temporary basis, then renting is a superb way of saving costs and commitments. Of course, you need to do a lot of work as well. You need to bring your belongings and family over. Try not to bring everything, as this will be costly and stressful to you and if you can sell stuff to raise funds, even better! If you do need to bring stuff over – consider international removals services that can help move your possessions to your new home.

Moving abroad whether it be a temporary move or a permanent one will always be stressful. It is moving to a new world! Is it affordable? Yes – but it will almost always be more costly than simply owning a home in your current country due to initial costs. It isn’t impossible, though.

Tips on Teaching Children About Money

Children tend to think that money grows on trees. Most children can’t walk through a shop without asking if they can have something. A simple ‘no’ may result in a meltdown if you have an infant in the family. It’s all part and parcel of parenting, but so is teaching your child about money. There will come a day when your children will have to know that you work hard to give them what they have and that the value of money is important. So, how do you teach a child about money?

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Let Them Handle It

As your child gets old enough to do sums, let them handle money. Use the money to work on their mathematics skills at home. You’ll be surprised how a jar full of pennies can occupy a child. You may also want to let them calculate what they spend when you’re out shopping. For instance, if your child has birthday money to spend, ask them to stay within their limit by adding up the cost of their items. You can also ask them to pay at the till and wait for any change.

Give Them a Goal

If there’s a particular toy your child wants to buy, ask them to save for it themselves. As parents its an instinct to provide your child with their needs and wants, but it’s a valuable life lesson. Offer to give your child pocket money in exchange for good behaviour, completed homework and completed chores. Agree on an amount per week and let your child work out how long it will take him/her to save for what they want.

Explain Bills

Unless you explain it, your child may not realise there’s such a thing as an electricity bill. Children have a habit of leaving lights on, wasting water and leaving the TV on when no-ones watching it. If you explain that every time they put a light on it costs money, they may think twice about doing it. You can also save money by switching energy providers. You can compare energy providers at Selectra energy comparison specialists.

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Teenage Spending

As your children get older, their wants get more expensive. When your children turn sixteen, encourage them to get their first job and save for the things they want. That may be their first car which could be the most money they’ve ever spent. Teach them how to budget their money so they have money left over to save and put towards a reliable car. Here are some of the best new cars for first time drivers.

Be Open

Remember the old chestnut, ‘not while you’re living under my roof’? Past generations didn’t tend to explain why they had to say no. If you haven’t got the money to buy something your child wants, tell them why. Explain that your money has to go towards higher priorities. They won’t always understand but giving them a reason is better than telling them that you know best. They’ll thank you for being open and honest in the long run.